The CCES Calls for Swift Action on Russia’s Failure to Comply

(Ottawa, Ontario – January 2, 2019) – Russia must be held to account for missing the December 31, 2018 deadline to provide the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) access to critical information (electronic data and samples) associated with the now widely known, state-sponsored doping scandal. In a joint statement (see below) by national anti-doping organizations from Australia, Austria, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Japan, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Singapore, Sweden, and USA, the call was issued for immediate action.

“It is now time for WADA to get on with its role as the global regulator – to enforce Code compliance with Russia and abandon its unsuccessful diplomatic approach,” said Paul Melia, President and CEO of the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport (CCES).

Notwithstanding WADA’s January 1 outline of the current status of their dealings with anti-doping compliance matters in Russia, the magnitude of this crisis in confidence demands immediate action by WADA. Awaiting a mid-January Compliance Review Committee meeting for further action is not necessary. WADA has the authority and capacity to convene the process without further delay – clean athletes deserve swift action.


Statement from National Anti-Doping Organisations on Russia Compliance Deadline

January 2nd, 2019 NADO Leaders acknowledge the January 1, 2019 Release from WADA outlining the current status of the management of anti-doping compliance matters in Russia.

With a view to its 31 December 2018 deadline for Russia to provide the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) with the critical LIMS data from the Moscow Laboratory, the anti-doping world fully expects a decisive response in support of the clean athletes of the world. After more than three years of review, indecision and compromise in response to the worst doping scandal in the history of sport, the time has come to demonstrate that no individual nor nation is exempt from compliance with the World Anti-Doping Code.

On 20 September 2018, the WADA Executive Committee created an opportunity by providing a new opportunity for Russia to demonstrate interest in protecting the rights of clean athletes and a willingness to play by the rules. Russia has failed to meet its obligations. Therefore, we now call on WADA to stand firm, enforce the missed deadline and move without delay towards a decision in this matter. Recognizing WADA had previously scheduled a Compliance Review Committee meeting on January 14-15, 2019, NADO Leaders now call on WADA to acknowledge the gravity of this missed deadline and call for an immediate review and recommendation from the CRC.

We recognise RUSADA has been working with WADA in an effort to resolve these issues, but the conditions agreed on 20 September 2018 were unequivocal and without the data there can be only one outcome. The importance of this situation does not warrant providing a further two weeks for Russia to comply. With the interest of clean sport hanging in the balance, WADA must call for CRC to convene and consider this matter without further delay.

In October 2018 NADO Leaders signalled our steadfast commitment to the global athlete community in support of clean sport. Today, that commitment is stronger than ever, and that is why we believe Russia must be held accountable for its continuing failure to comply. A return to international sport should only be considered for Russia once full confidence in a clean Russian sporting culture is restored – in other words, only once WADA has received and verified the electronic LIMS data as well as access to the samples in the Moscow Laboratory.

NADO Leaders implore WADA to use its full authority and resources to expedite this matter.

This Statement is supported by the National Anti-Doping Organisations of: Australia, Austria, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Japan, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Singapore, Sweden, and USA


About the CCES

The CCES is an independent, national, not-for profit organization with a responsibility to administer the Canadian Anti-Doping Program. We recognize that true sport can make a great difference for individuals, communities and our country. The CCES acknowledges funding, in part, from the Government of Canada. We are committed to making sport better by working collaboratively to activate a values-based and principle-driven sport system; protecting the integrity of sport from the negative forces of doping and other unethical threats; and advocating for sport that is fair, safe and open to everyone.

-- 30 --

For further information, please contact:

Megan Cumming
Manager, Corporate Communications
+1 613-521-3340 x3233
mcumming@cces.ca