Tokyo 2020: Considerations for Canadian Athletes and Athlete Support Personnel

The Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport (CCES) has been inspired by the resilience and perseverance demonstrated by the Canadians who are preparing for the 2020 Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games while managing the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. We hope the 2020 Tokyo Games are a safe and rewarding experience for every member of Team Canada. 

This summer, the CCES wants to ensure that every athlete representing Canada in Tokyo has the knowledge, tools, and motivation to demonstrate their commitment to clean sport and anti-doping rules. If you find it important to practice the values of True Sport – fairness, excellence, inclusion, and fun – then you are well on your way!  

Olympic Games
The Games period begins on July 13, 2021 with the opening of the Olympic Village, and ends August 8, 2021, the day of the Closing Ceremony.
 
Important dates related to Therapeutic Use Exemptions (TUEs) for the Olympic Games follow: 
 
  • Prior to July 13: Submit Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) applications to the CCES or international federation (IF) if needed.
  • After July 13: The CCES and/or IF submit existing TUEs to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) for review. Athletes who require a new TUE must apply to the IOC TUE committee from this date forward, not the CCES. TUE applications to the IOC must be submitted through ADAMS
  • NOTE: Athletes who received a TUE from their IF should ensure it was properly entered into ADAMS, which would be confirmed by receiving a TUE certificate. If you did not receive confirmation from your IF, please contact them. 
Paralympic Games

The Games period begins on August 17, 2021 with the opening of the Athletes’ Village, and ends September 5, 2021, the day of the Closing Ceremony.

Important dates related to TUEs for the Paralympic Games follow:  

  • Prior to August 3: Submit TUE applications to the CCES or IF as needed.
  • August 3: The CCES and/or IF submit existing TUEs to International Paralympic Committee (IPC) for review. Athletes who require a new TUE must apply to the IPC, not CCES, from this date forward. 

Tokyo 2020 FAQ

Who can test athletes at the Games?

For Olympic Games

During the Olympic Games period, athletes are under the jurisdiction of the IOC, regardless of where they are and when they arrive in or leave Tokyo. The IOC delegated its authority to implement the doping control program to the International Testing Agency (ITA) and sample collection responsibilities for the Games have been delegated to the Tokyo Organizing Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games.

 

For Paralympic Games

During the Paralympic Games period, athletes are under the jurisdiction of the IPC, regardless of where they are and when they arrive in or leave Tokyo. Sample collection responsibilities for the Games have been delegated to the Tokyo Organizing Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games.

What are my rights and responsibilities during sample collection the Games?

When being tested at the Games, your rights and responsibilities are unchanged.

You have a right to a representative, and we recommend all athletes exercise that right. Your representative could be your coach, manager or other support person. Athlete representatives are there to support and assist the athlete. Remember, athletes also have the right to ask for an interpreter, ask questions about the sample collection process, ask for modifications and ask for a delay in reporting for a valid reason.

You have the responsibility to comply with sample collection procedures, report to the doping control station immediately (unless you are granted a delay), remain in sight of the chaperone at all times, provide valid ID, maintain control of your sample until it is sealed, and ensure that all your documentation is accurate. 

What is the TUE application process for the Games?

For Olympic Games

Prior to July 13, 2021, if an athlete already has a TUE granted by the CCES or their IF and the TUE is available on ADAMS, the athlete does not need to apply for recognition of this TUE as it will automatically be recognized.

If an athlete has a TUE that is not available in ADAMS, the athlete should submit a request for recognition at least 30 days before the Games period begins (which is June 13, 2021). The IOC TUE Committee is entitled to review any TUE in order to ensure that it meets the criteria set out by the International Standard for Therapeutic Use Exemptions (ISTUE) and request further documentation if needed.

Athletes who require a new TUE as of July 13, 2021 must apply to the IOC TUE Committee through ADAMS or the dedicated office in the Village Polyclinic. Please note that any TUE granted by the IOC is effective for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games only.

 

For Paralympic Games

Athletes with a valid TUE from the CCES or their IF must ensure their TUE is submitted to the IPC by August 3, 2021. This can be done either through ADAMS or via email ([email protected]).

Athletes who require a new TUE prior to August 3 should use the CCES Medical Exemption Wizard to determine prior to the Games whether they must send the request to their IF or to the CCES.

Athletes who require a new TUE as of August 3, 2021 must apply to the IPC TUE Committee through ADAMS or by email to [email protected], and must ensure that the submission is in English. If approved, the TUE will only be valid for the duration of the Games (unless the IPC is the IF for the sport).

Do I need to change how I submit whereabouts during the Games?

All athletes included in a Registered Testing Pool (RTP) during the Games period must continue to maintain accurate and up-to-date whereabouts information through ADAMS as is normally required. Athletes must include accommodation details while in Japan, such as room numbers if staying in the Olympic Village or Athletes’ Village.

For athletes not included in a RTP, the IOC and IPC require the Canadian Olympic Committee and Canadian Paralympic Committee, respectively, to provide whereabouts information during the Games period, including travel schedules, accommodation details and training schedules.

What should I do if I suspect an athlete or athlete support personnel is involved in doping?

Prior to the Games, you can report doping by:

  • visiting the CCES Report Doping website to fill out the online form,
  • downloading the CCES Report Doping App from Google Play or App Store,
  • calling the Report Doping Hotline at 1-800-710-CCES (2237), or
  • emailing [email protected].

During the Games, you can report doping through the World Anti-Doping Agency’s Speak Up program, which receives and processes information about potential doping. Any information you pass on is strictly confidential. You can choose to provide information anonymously if you wish.

What can I do to avoid an unintentional anti-doping rule violation or medication issues while traveling?

As an athlete, you prepare every detail of your training and competition, and the same should apply to travel. Before you leave Canada, review these simple Clean Sport Travel Tips to help you minimize the risk of an unintentional anti-doping rule violation and to avoid issues with medications.

See Also...

WADA ADEL elearning course

Elearning course for Tokyo-bound athletes

WADA Speak Up!

A resource developed by WADA and IOC to help athletes report doping and harassment during the games

IOC Rules Tokyo 2020

International Olympic Committee Anti-Doping Rules applicable to the Games of the XXXII Olympiad Tokyo 2020

IPC Rules Tokyo 2020

The International Paralympic Committee Anti-Doping Code applies to the Paralympic Games and to all events and competitions under the jurisdiction of the IPC.

Tokyo 2020 Anti-Doping webpage

An introduction to the anti-doping activities leading up to and during the Tokyo 2020 Games

True Sport website

True Sport logo

True Sport includes every sport at every level: from little-leaguers to Olympians and Paralympians. Learn more at truesportpur.ca.