2016 Olympic & Paralympic Games

Congratulations on being selected to represent Canada at the 2016 Olympic & Paralympic Games in Rio!

Here are some helpful resources and reminders as you prepare for the Games: 

Game period

Olympic Games

  • Period of the Games – July 24, 2016 (Village opening) to August 21, 2016 (closing ceremonies).
  • During that time, athletes will be under the jurisdiction of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and subject to doping control at any time, and at any place, with no advance notice as per the IOC Anti-Doping Rules.

Paralympic Games

  • Period of the Games – August 31, 2016 (Village opening) to September 18, 2016 (closing ceremonies).
  • During that time, athletes will be under the jurisdiction of the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) and subject to doping control at any time, and at any place, with no advance notice as per the IPC Anti-Doping Code.

Therapeutic Use Exemptions (TUEs)

Olympic Games

  • Athletes who are taking a prohibited substance for medically justified reasons must have a valid TUE. They must contact their team physician and their International Federation (IF) to review their TUE requirements.
  • Athletes who currently have a TUE from their IF must verify the expiry date to ensure it will be valid through the period of the Games.
  • Athletes who have a TUE from the CCES must contact their IF to seek recognition of the TUE for the Games (team physicians and the CCES can assist with that process).
  • Athletes who need an emergency TUE during the Games must apply directly to the IOC Medical Commission (the team physician will assist you with that process).
  • To obtain more TUE information visit the CCES’ Medical Exemption Wizard: www.cces.ca/medical-exemptions.

Paralympic Games

  • Athletes who are taking a prohibited substance for medically justified reasons must have a valid TUE. They must contact their team physician and their International Federation (IF) to review their TUE requirements.
  • Athletes who currently have a TUE from their IF must verify the expiry date to ensure it will be valid through the period of the Games.
  • Athletes who have a TUE from the CCES must contact their IF to seek recognition of the TUE for the Games (team physicians and the CCES can assist with that process).
  • From August 1, 2016, athletes who need a TUE must apply directly to the IPC Medical Committee (through ADAMS or by email to tue@paralympic.org).
  • To obtain more TUE information visit the CCES’ Medical Exemption Wizard: www.cces.ca/medical-exemptions.

Check Your Medications!

  • The 2016 WADA Prohibited List will be in effect.
  • Samples collected 12 hours prior to a competition through to the end of the competition (competition = single race, match or game) will be analyzed for all substances and methods on the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) 2016 Prohibited List.
  • Samples collected outside of an athlete’s competition period will be analyzed for those substances and methods that are prohibited at all times (i.e., substances prohibited out-of-competition).Verify the status of medications:

o Global DRO: www.globaldro.com (accessible on your smartphone)
o Contact the CCES: substances@cces.ca or 1-800-672-7775

  • Strict liability: Athletes are responsible for any substance found in their sample. Ignorance is not an excuse and will not exempt them from the consequences of a doping violation.

Supplement Use

  • Supplement use is risky. There is no way to guarantee that any supplement is free of prohibited substances – even those that do not list a prohibited substance on the label.
  • Consult the CCES website for additional information: www.cces.ca/supplements.

Whereabouts Information

  • If athletes are included in the CCES’ Registered Testing Pool (RTP), or their International Federation (FI), they must continue to update their whereabouts during the period of the Games (www.adams.wada-ama.org).
  • Athletes are reminded to provide the following information:

o 60-minute time slot and location for testing
o Accommodation details (including room number in the Village)
o Competition schedule
o Training location and times

  • Athletes may appoint a team leader, agent, coach, etc. to submit whereabouts information, but ultimately they are responsible for the accuracy of their information.
  • Whether or not athletes are included in the RTP, they should keep their team leader informed of their location during the Games period.

Doping Control Procedures during the Games

  • Athletes are encouraged to bring someone with them during the doping control process to act as their representative and assist with translation or interpretation as needed.
  • Any concerns regarding the doping control process should be noted on a Supplementary Report or on the Doping Control Form in the ‘Comments’ area.
  • Athletes are reminded that once notified for doping control they must report to the doping control station immediately unless they request a delay for a valid reason such as performing a warm down, obtaining medical treatment, fulfilling media commitments, completing a training session, etc. If athletes are granted a delay in reporting to the doping control station, or a leave from the doping control station, they will be accompanied by a chaperone.
  • For more information on the doping control process, rights and responsibilities and to view a short video consult: www.cces.ca/samplecollection.

Additional Information or Questions

  • The IPC considers the use of a urinary catheter by an athlete with a need for self-catheterisation as ‘personal equipment’. Athletes who use urinary catheters for anti-doping sample collection purposes should supply their own catheter.
  • Rio 2016 will equip doping control stations with a number of sealed, sterile catheters but this will not include all brands, sizes and/or materials.
  • Glycerol is prohibited as a plasma expander. Some athletes may use glycerol as a lubricant agent for a catheter. The IPC, in its Rio Doping Control Guide and in a recent position statement, indicated that it is aware of exceptional cases of adverse analytical findings (AAFs) caused by self-catheterization in doping control related to the use of glycerol. WADA has recently increased the threshold for reporting an AAF for glycerol and stated that: “The consumption of quantities of glycerol far beyond those commonly found in e.g. foods, beverages, personal care products, medicinal tablets, cough syrup is required to produce an AAF. Therefore, its prohibition is not intended to prevent the ingestion of this substance in the amounts commonly found in foodstuffs and toiletries, as such small quantities will not cause an athlete to test positive for this Prohibited Substance. In addition, athletes with disabilities may use glycerol as a lubricant agent for a catheter but this will not cause a problem in a doping control for the aforementioned reasons.”
  • If you have any questions or concerns, please contact your team physician or the CCES.
  • Sign up for alerts and advisories at www.cces.ca/subscribe.
  • Consult the CCES website (www.cces.ca) frequently to ensure you have the most up-to-date information, specifically the ‘Athlete Zone’ section: www.cces.ca/athletezone.